Why Kindle?

Early B'Day Present

What I asked for, and received, for my birthday, was an Amazon Kindle, the 6-inch screen international model sold to Canadians.

Several of my friends told me they were surprised I didn’t go for an iPad. Given my penchant for tech toys, it’s a legitimate observation. Here’s my attempt at an explanation.

First, let me say I have nothing but admiration for the iPad. I’ve held one and had a good look at it. I also have an iPod Touch I use frequently, which, I believe, provides me with a smaller but similar experience to the iPad.

Though it may be counter-intuitive, it’s the iPod Touch experience that dampened my enthusiasm for the iPad. The reason is that it can do too many things.

When a technology provides multiple things that can be done with it, I’m the kind of person who tends to hop from thing to thing, enjoying each goodie. I add programs. I do my email. I check blog sites. I solve a sudoku. You know the drill.

Everything about the iPad is leading edge and is justly praiseworthy. However, I’ve confirmed many times over that, for me, trailing-edge technologies that offer less sometimes deliver more.

Take word processors, for example. Though they do many things well, including decent page layout, I do all my professional and personal writing in plain text editors. I import them into a word processor to pass along to editors, but I get more done with simple text editors. They’re less distracting, and the files are superbly portable.

Another example is the AlphaSmart Neo. It’s essentially little more than an electronic typewriter with a great keyboard and a small LCD screen. It stores files as text files and squirts them into computer programs via a USB cable. When I have the Neo along, instead of the Touch or the netbook, the only option I have is writing. And I write more, with better concentration.

Turn this to reading, and I had a hunch that the Kindle would result in my spending more time reading e-books than an e-book reader on a multipurpose device. The Kindle essentially does only one thing, and does it well. It provides a good reading screen, simple controls, great battery life, and the ability to annotate and make notes.

I’ve had the Kindle less than five days and I’ve already read two novels and am halfway through another. I’ve also read several short stories. It’s light enough to hand hold while I’m lying in bed.

There are drawbacks to the Kindle, or any e-Ink e-book reader such as the Sony Reader. They don’t display colour. Although the Kindle will display PDFs they’re hard to read. The Kindle is not well adapted to newspaper formats, with fancy columns.

But feed it straight text–the kind you get in stories and essays–and it allows you to see right through the device itself, into the flow of the text. That is, it provides a good reading experience.

I don’t chase best sellers, so contemporary e-books aren’t a high priority for me, though they’re available. What I like is downloading Project Gutenberg copies of free e-books from sites such as manybooks.net that offer them in just about any popular e-book format, including Kindle’s native AZW format.

So far I’ve read John Buchan’s The Thirty-Nine Steps, G.K. Chesterton’s The Man Who Was Thursday, and I’m well into H.P. Lovecraft’s The Shadow Out of Time. I’ve been reading short stories by Poe, and the Sherlockian adventures of Conan Doyle. There are thirty or so more books waiting in line.

Do I like the Kindle? Very much! Sometimes less is more.

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About Gene Wilburn

Gene Wilburn is a writer ~ photographer ~ humanist
This entry was posted in Books & eBooks, Kindle, Reading. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Why Kindle?

  1. bg says:

    The same with cameras. Older, simpler cameras let you think more about photography, rather than geeting lost in menus for features you don;t want or need. Also pianos. When learning piano an accoustic piano, or simple elecronic piano will keep the focus on the playing of music, and not the exploration of all the different sounds the keyboard can make. Oh, and I pedal more and hunt for gears less on my old 12-speed, compared to my 21-speed mountain bike. I’m beginning to sound like an old man.

  2. Gene Wilburn says:

    bg, well stated. Too much often leads to confusion.

  3. bg says:

    Thanks, Gene. I’ll have to work on my typing.

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